What can you do, as the administrator, to reduce the potential for injury to this important group of staff members?

Read the following excerpt. What can you do, as the administrator, to reduce the potential for injury to this important group of staff members? be specific. “Most of the nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants who were injured or became ill were women suffering sprains and strains to the back due to overexertion related to lifting or moving patients.” Source: Occupations with the Most Injuries and Illnesses with Days Away from Work, 2002; William J. Wiatrowski, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

As an administrator, I would enforce the following intervention types: patient lift systems, patient handling training, multi-component interventions, and cognitive behavioral therapy.

The situation necessitates more aggressive training on using lifting devices and lifting teams specifically for new staff. It might involve ergonomic training in lifting techniques to combat the high cases of back injuries.

The organization should provide annual training on lifting and transferring patients to all staff responsible for giving direct care. It is necessary to redesign the work for the hospital personnel to use mechanical lifting, such as mechanical hoists or sliding boards.

Designing the working environment is crucial in reducing back strain that may occur due to cumulative injury. For example, shelf heights could get re-adjusted to prevent or reduce bending. The staff should use assistive devices in all tasks involving patient handling. For instance, when lifting a patient from the bed, it is necessary to use an assistive device, such as a friction-reducing sheet.

The affected staff should receive support by applying cognitive behavior therapy. It replaces maladaptive behavior patterns with functional alternatives. This technique can influence personnel’s exercise participation, relaxation skills, and fear-avoidance of movements critical to pain and injury.